Psychotherapist who thinks he’s a wireless device

I had never even heard of Derek O’Neill when a friend mentioned she was going to his NYC workshop, then I received an email notifying me of it. So I thought maybe I should check out this self proclaimed “healer, spiritual teacher”, “accomplished motivational analyst, renowned psychotherapist, and inspired public speaker” (ok…ever heard of a motivational analyst?!)
So I opened the email and read the advert for his upcoming workshop “More truth will set you free”. Let’s see…more or less another “snake oil salesman “claiming to set people free from “the chains that bind them” yadda, yadda…there are as many of these guys as burgers at MacDonalds…and this stuff is fast food…but this guy says ” His message is in alignment with all the tried and tested philosophies throughout history”……..so he’s a copy cat who is just out to make a buck off vulnerable people looking for miracle???

Ok….how much is he charging for his remarkable-ness???
Here we go…from the email…
“Exchange: For live attendance, $100 until February 20 (11:59pm tonight). After February 20, exchange is $120. For non-SQ members, your live workshop registration includes a trial membership in SQ Wellness ($45 value).”

“For remote attendance, exchange is $30 for SQ members. For non-SQ members, exchange is $75 which includes a trial membership in SQ Wellness ($45 value), OR $50 without a trial membership”

Remote Attendance????????? He must mean TV? No.
Conference call? No. Must be internet/skype…No… not that either!
Here is how Derek O’Neill presents his workshop remotely:
from the email and his website…
“Attending Derek’s More Truth Will Set You Free workshops remotely is a powerful experience. Much energy and<<< benefit>>> will come to you wherever you are. When attending remotely, you can either sit quietly or in meditation at the time of the workshop and tune into the energy of the class, or you can go about your day as usual. Either way, the energy will travel directly from the workshop to you. PAY ATTENTION TO THIS: “Derek’s workshops are not broadcast on-line or otherwise videotaped”. No need to sign on through your computer or be on the phone. Just relax and enjoy the experience”.
I won’t go into telepathy or psychic transmission theories…what I’m actually amazed at is that he sets a fee for this invisible non-evidence based practice and expects to be paid for it!
He apparently believes he is a wireless device and that people should pay him for his transmission over the airwaves…can I be arrested for theft if I “tune in” without paying the workshop fee?

It gets better…go back up and read where I wrote PAY ATTENTION TO THIS again….it says “Derek’s workshops are not broadcast on-line or otherwise videotaped”. No need to sign on through your computer or be on the phone. Just relax and enjoy the experience”
….and below you see the following:
“Please note, your attendance to this workshop is subject to the following terms and conditions:
“You understand that the workshop may be <<<videotaped>>> and/or audio taped for distribution, marketing and sale. You hereby waive and assign to Born Free Now, LP, Derek O’Neill, and any other companies or individuals necessary to reproduce and market this workshop, all intellectual property rights that you may have in your image, name, voice, actions and/or words recorded in this workshop.” Nothing like a hypocritical healer!

“You agree that no one has promised or guaranteed to you any benefit<<<geez…above it says I will benefit ….even long distance!>>> from this workshop and you are attending this workshop of your own free will. You waive any and all rights for damages (physical, financial or emotional) you may claim as a result of attending this workshop. You release Derek O’Neill, Born Free Now LP and any staff or volunteers assisting the workshop from any causes of action, litigation, arbitration or claims you might have from attending this workshop. You understand that attending this workshop may substantially change your life and consciousness and you freely accept and embrace that change, regardless of any effects that such a life changing experience may create”.

“You agree that any minors attending this workshop with you under your care, custody and control will be bound by the terms herein”.

WTF???!!!!
Please all— STAY AWAY FROM BAD THERAPISTS!!!!!!!…especially those claiming to have a “cure-all”!
If they can’t be honest and straight forward in an email, I can imagine the manipulation in the “workshop”! Everyone has the right to earn a living, but offering a healing workshop “over the airwaves” and charging $50 bucks for it  perhaps to some family with a terminally ill loved one laying in bed at home hoping for a miracle…is just plain scummy!

The only guarantee in remotely attending Derek O’Neill’s  “truth” workshop is that you will be “set free” of $50!

 here’s a link if you ‘d like to check it out yourself:

http://www.sq-wellness.com/workshops/derek-oneill-nyc-2011/

hmmm…do you think my boss will believe me if I tell him that I’m staying home tomorrow and  he will benefit from my services anyway because he’s paying me?

…and another thought for all therapists con!sidering doing e-therapy/web based therapy sessions….this guy is way ahead of you! Better find out his “secret”

Here’s a link to a testimonial froma not so happy former practitioner of his “Rising Star” Healing (cult)

 http://chiflow.tribe.net/thread/68ed92d0-1d65-47e4-9297-d8539f939d4c

Advertisements

necessary loss of a therapist

 
On this day three years ago my former therapist found out that I reported him for insurance fraud …Wow was that an uncomfortable discussion, starting at 430pm in the evening and lasting  5 hours into the night!
  Leonard R. morphed into a  worm….visibly wriggling and contorting himself to convince me I was the “bad guy” who needed forgiveness for my “grievous error”  in reporting him to the insurance company for insurance fraud! 
That he attempted to make this “grist for the mill” in a therapeutic sense boggled my brain! I was no longer a client of his in the first place….second, he did something illegal, not just unethical! Yet he went forth that night proclaiming that he was the person wronged….that I should have told him the detailed consequences of what would happen if he did not pay back the insurance company and have my sessions reinstated….( he had failed to fulfill his end of a deal we had made after I caught the insurance fraud in February 2007 that he would not place claims with the insurance company for the next 7 sessions until we caught up  with the number of sessions he had already billed for….sounded like a easy, clear deal to me! The dumbass went ahead and put the claims in anyway) He had had almost a year, 8 months in which he was no longer considered to be “my therapist” to do this,
After considering my options for a several months, and realizing that Leonard R was a “man of many words”…..but not a “man of his word” I turned the issue over to the insurance company….and later to the State of Connecticut Department of Public health. (there is no Licensing Board in Ct.)
 
 I most had to answer to myself as to why I even agreed to have this discussion with him! Why had  I placed myself in this sort of situation?
 It wouldn’t even be a brief consideration today!   I wouldn’t make it through the first session with a therapist like Leonard R…perhaps not even the first phone call…the red flags were flying then and there!

The Buddha on belief

In today’s world I find the below teaching of the Buddha very, very useful!
Perhaps we can all learn from what the Buddha purportedly said about belief:

“Believe nothing because a wise person said it. Believe nothing because it is generally held. Believe nothing because it is written. Believe nothing because it is said to be Divine. Believe nothing because someone else believes it. But believe only what you yourself judge to be true.”

Connecticut Department of Public Health Quarterly Action Reports

Here’s a link to a report on some  “select”  Licensed Health Professionals in Connecticut.

http://www.ct.gov/dph/lib/dph/communications/rar/pdf/qu_3_10.pdf

The volume of hairdressers, and nurses still amazes me! So does the very low count of Mental Health Professionals…one LPC, and one Psychologist, who was mentioned as he “completed his probation” for incompetance/negligence…feel safe?
….and I still wonder what an embalmer can do wrong!

NASW Ethics Code “wishy-washy”

How strong can the NASW ethics code be when the words “should”/”should not” appear 70+ times in just section 1!

you can count for yourself here or below…

http://www.naswdc.org/pubs/code/code.asp …or below….

The only act expressly prohibited by the code is having sexual relations with a client.(Sec1.09)

Even section 1.11 on Sexual Harassment only states that “Social workers should not sexually harass clients. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.”

So what gives folks! You have an ethics code that a LCSW can run circles around and violate all but one aspect of that code without recourse or being concerned as to the outcome of unethical actions. “Should’s” and “should nots” are wide open to interpretation and do not serve to enhance the professions credibility or protect the interests of a client.

Sure, living life is hazardous in itself… and there is no guaranteed “safety” contract anywhere, but an ethics code of a professional organization must support the ideals of the organization in order to maintain it’s integrity…”should’s and should nots” are weak, unstable and to say it simply….”wishy-washy”

Section one of the NASE Code of Ethics
1. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO CLIENTS
1.01 Commitment to Clients
Social workers’ primary responsibility is to promote the well­being of clients. In general, clients’ interests are primary. However, social workers’ responsibility to the larger society or specific legal obligations may on limited occasions supersede the loyalty owed clients, and clients should be so advised. (Examples include when a social worker is required by law to report that a client has abused a child or has threatened to harm self or others.)

1.02 Self­Determination
Social workers respect and promote the right of clients to self­determination and assist clients in their efforts to identify and clarify their goals. Social workers may limit clients’ right to self­determination when, in the social workers’ professional judgment, clients’ actions or potential actions pose a serious, foreseeable, and imminent risk to themselves or others.

1.03 Informed Consent
(a) Social workers should provide services to clients only in the context of a professional relationship based, when appropriate, on valid informed consent. Social workers should use clear and understandable language to inform clients of the purpose of the services, risks related to the services, limits to services because of the requirements of a third­party payer, relevant costs, reasonable alternatives, clients’ right to refuse or withdraw consent, and the time frame covered by the consent. Social workers should provide clients with an opportunity to ask questions.

(b) In instances when clients are not literate or have difficulty understanding the primary language used in the practice setting, social workers should take steps to ensure clients’ comprehension. This may include providing clients with a detailed verbal explanation or arranging for a qualified interpreter or translator whenever possible.

(c) In instances when clients lack the capacity to provide informed consent, social workers should protect clients’ interests by seeking permission from an appropriate third party, informing clients consistent with the clients’ level of understanding. In such instances social workers should seek to ensure that the third party acts in a manner consistent with clients’ wishes and interests. Social workers should take reasonable steps to enhance such clients’ ability to give informed consent.

(d) In instances when clients are receiving services involuntarily, social workers should provide information about the nature and extent of services and about the extent of clients’ right to refuse service.

(e) Social workers who provide services via electronic media (such as computer, telephone, radio, and television) should inform recipients of the limitations and risks associated with such services.

(f) Social workers should obtain clients’ informed consent before audiotaping or videotaping clients or permitting observation of services to clients by a third party.

1.04 Competence
(a) Social workers should provide services and represent themselves as competent only within the boundaries of their education, training, license, certification, consultation received, supervised experience, or other relevant professional experience.

(b) Social workers should provide services in substantive areas or use intervention techniques or approaches that are new to them only after engaging in appropriate study, training, consultation, and supervision from people who are competent in those interventions or techniques.

(c) When generally recognized standards do not exist with respect to an emerging area of practice, social workers should exercise careful judgment and take responsible steps (including appropriate education, research, training, consultation, and supervision) to ensure the competence of their work and to protect clients from harm.

1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity
(a) Social workers should understand culture and its function in human behavior and society, recognizing the strengths that exist in all cultures.

(b) Social workers should have a knowledge base of their clients’ cultures and be able to demonstrate competence in the provision of services that are sensitive to clients’ cultures and to differences among people and cultural groups.

(c) Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

1.06 Conflicts of Interest
(a) Social workers should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest that interfere with the exercise of professional discretion and impartial judgment. Social workers should inform clients when a real or potential conflict of interest arises and take reasonable steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes the clients’ interests primary and protects clients’ interests to the greatest extent possible. In some cases, protecting clients’ interests may require termination of the professional relationship with proper referral of the client.

(b) Social workers should not take unfair advantage of any professional relationship or exploit others to further their personal, religious, political, or business interests.

(c) Social workers should not engage in dual or multiple relationships with clients or former clients in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client. In instances when dual or multiple relationships are unavoidable, social workers should take steps to protect clients and are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries. (Dual or multiple relationships occur when social workers relate to clients in more than one relationship, whether professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively.)

(d) When social workers provide services to two or more people who have a relationship with each other (for example, couples, family members), social workers should clarify with all parties which individuals will be considered clients and the nature of social workers’ professional obligations to the various individuals who are receiving services. Social workers who anticipate a conflict of interest among the individuals receiving services or who anticipate having to perform in potentially conflicting roles (for example, when a social worker is asked to testify in a child custody dispute or divorce proceedings involving clients) should clarify their role with the parties involved and take appropriate action to minimize any conflict of interest.

1.07 Privacy and Confidentiality
(a) Social workers should respect clients’ right to privacy. Social workers should not solicit private information from clients unless it is essential to providing services or conducting social work evaluation or research. Once private information is shared, standards of confidentiality apply.

(b) Social workers may disclose confidential information when appropriate with valid consent from a client or a person legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client.

(c) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of all information obtained in the course of professional service, except for compelling professional reasons. The general expectation that social workers will keep information confidential does not apply when disclosure is necessary to prevent serious, foreseeable, and imminent harm to a client or other identifiable person. In all instances, social workers should disclose the least amount of confidential information necessary to achieve the desired purpose; only information that is directly relevant to the purpose for which the disclosure is made should be revealed.

(d) Social workers should inform clients, to the extent possible, about the disclosure of confidential information and the potential consequences, when feasible before the disclosure is made. This applies whether social workers disclose confidential information on the basis of a legal requirement or client consent.

(e) Social workers should discuss with clients and other interested parties the nature of confidentiality and limitations of clients’ right to confidentiality. Social workers should review with clients circumstances where confidential information may be requested and where disclosure of confidential information may be legally required. This discussion should occur as soon as possible in the social worker­client relationship and as needed throughout the course of the relationship.

(f) When social workers provide counseling services to families, couples, or groups, social workers should seek agreement among the parties involved concerning each individual’s right to confidentiality and obligation to preserve the confidentiality of information shared by others. Social workers should inform participants in family, couples, or group counseling that social workers cannot guarantee that all participants will honor such agreements.

(g) Social workers should inform clients involved in family, couples, marital, or group counseling of the social worker’s, employer’s, and agency’s policy concerning the social worker’s disclosure of confidential information among the parties involved in the counseling.

(h) Social workers should not disclose confidential information to third­party payers unless clients have authorized such disclosure.

(i) Social workers should not discuss confidential information in any setting unless privacy can be ensured. Social workers should not discuss confidential information in public or semipublic areas such as hallways, waiting rooms, elevators, and restaurants.

(j) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients during legal proceedings to the extent permitted by law. When a court of law or other legally authorized body orders social workers to disclose confidential or privileged information without a client’s consent and such disclosure could cause harm to the client, social workers should request that the court withdraw the order or limit the order as narrowly as possible or maintain the records under seal, unavailable for public inspection.

(k) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients when responding to requests from members of the media.

(l) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients’ written and electronic records and other sensitive information. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that clients’ records are stored in a secure location and that clients’ records are not available to others who are not authorized to have access.

(m) Social workers should take precautions to ensure and maintain the confidentiality of information transmitted to other parties through the use of computers, electronic mail, facsimile machines, telephones and telephone answering machines, and other electronic or computer technology. Disclosure of identifying information should be avoided whenever possible.

(n) Social workers should transfer or dispose of clients’ records in a manner that protects clients’ confidentiality and is consistent with state statutes governing records and social work licensure.

(o) Social workers should take reasonable precautions to protect client confidentiality in the event of the social worker’s termination of practice, incapacitation, or death.

(p) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients for teaching or training purposes unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information.

(q) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients with consultants unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information or there is a compelling need for such disclosure.

(r) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of deceased clients consistent with the preceding standards.

1.08 Access to Records
(a) Social workers should provide clients with reasonable access to records concerning the clients. Social workers who are concerned that clients’ access to their records could cause serious misunderstanding or harm to the client should provide assistance in interpreting the records and consultation with the client regarding the records. Social workers should limit clients’ access to their records, or portions of their records, only in exceptional circumstances when there is compelling evidence that such access would cause serious harm to the client. Both clients’ requests and the rationale for withholding some or all of the record should be documented in clients’ files.

(b) When providing clients with access to their records, social workers should take steps to protect the confidentiality of other individuals identified or discussed in such records.

1.09 Sexual Relationships
(a) Social workers should under no circumstances engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with current clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.

(b) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with clients’ relatives or other individuals with whom clients maintain a close personal relationship when there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client. Sexual activity or sexual contact with clients’ relatives or other individuals with whom clients maintain a personal relationship has the potential to be harmful to the client and may make it difficult for the social worker and client to maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Social workers—not their clients, their clients’ relatives, or other individuals with whom the client maintains a personal relationship—assume the full burden for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with former clients because of the potential for harm to the client. If social workers engage in conduct contrary to this prohibition or claim that an exception to this prohibition is warranted because of extraordinary circumstances, it is social workers—not their clients—who assume the full burden of demonstrating that the former client has not been exploited, coerced, or manipulated, intentionally or unintentionally.

(d) Social workers should not provide clinical services to individuals with whom they have had a prior sexual relationship. Providing clinical services to a former sexual partner has the potential to be harmful to the individual and is likely to make it difficult for the social worker and individual to maintain appropriate professional boundaries.

1.10 Physical Contact
Social workers should not engage in physical contact with clients when there is a possibility of psychological harm to the client as a result of the contact (such as cradling or caressing clients). Social workers who engage in appropriate physical contact with clients are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such physical contact.

1.11 Sexual Harassment
Social workers should not sexually harass clients. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

1.12 Derogatory Language
Social workers should not use derogatory language in their written or verbal communications to or about clients. Social workers should use accurate and respectful language in all communications to and about clients.

1.13 Payment for Services
(a) When setting fees, social workers should ensure that the fees are fair, reasonable, and commensurate with the services performed. Consideration should be given to clients’ ability to pay.

(b) Social workers should avoid accepting goods or services from clients as payment for professional services. Bartering arrangements, particularly involving services, create the potential for conflicts of interest, exploitation, and inappropriate boundaries in social workers’ relationships with clients. Social workers should explore and may participate in bartering only in very limited circumstances when it can be demonstrated that such arrangements are an accepted practice among professionals in the local community, considered to be essential for the provision of services, negotiated without coercion, and entered into at the client’s initiative and with the client’s informed consent. Social workers who accept goods or services from clients as payment for professional services assume the full burden of demonstrating that this arrangement will not be detrimental to the client or the professional relationship.

(c) Social workers should not solicit a private fee or other remuneration for providing services to clients who are entitled to such available services through the social workers’ employer or agency.

1.14 Clients Who Lack Decision­Making Capacity
When social workers act on behalf of clients who lack the capacity to make informed decisions, social workers should take reasonable steps to safeguard the interests and rights of those clients.

1.15 Interruption of Services
Social workers should make reasonable efforts to ensure continuity of services in the event that services are interrupted by factors such as unavailability, relocation, illness, disability, or death.

1.16 Termination of Services
(a) Social workers should terminate services to clients and professional relationships with them when such services and
relationships are no longer required or no longer serve the clients’ needs or interests.

(b) Social workers should take reasonable steps to avoid abandoning clients who are still in need of services. Social workers should withdraw services precipitously only under unusual circumstances, giving careful consideration to all factors in the situation and taking care to minimize possible adverse effects. Social workers should assist in making appropriate arrangements for continuation of services when necessary.

(c) Social workers in fee­for­service settings may terminate services to clients who are not paying an overdue balance if the financial contractual arrangements have been made clear to the client, if the client does not pose an imminent danger to self or others, and if the clinical and other consequences of the current nonpayment have been addressed and discussed with the client.

(d) Social workers should not terminate services to pursue a social, financial, or sexual relationship with a client.

(e) Social workers who anticipate the termination or interruption of services to clients should notify clients promptly and seek the transfer, referral, or continuation of services in relation to the clients’ needs and preferences.

(f) Social workers who are leaving an employment setting should inform clients of appropriate options for the continuation of services and of the benefits and risks of the options.

LCSW, LMFT, LADC, LPC… and what is a psychotherapist?

The below list is that of Credentialed professionals that are Licensed Mental Health Practitioners. Most States use similar titles, but the actual License Title may change. For example, in Connecticut a Licensed Clinical Social Worker is an LCSW…in Massachusetts a similar Title is LICSW….Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker. The key word is “Licensed” . Ph.d, Psy.D and MD are Licensed Credentials recognized nationwide by each State. See your States Mental health Regulatory Agency for exact info.

(General) Licensed Mental Health Professional Titles:

Psychiatrist MD
Psychologist Ph.D.
Licensed Clinical Social worker LCSW
Licensed Professional Counselor LPC
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist LMFT
Licensed Alcohol and Drug counselor LADC
Advanced Practice Registered Nurse APRN

Some States do have registries for unlicensed Mental Health and Alternative Health Practitioners, Connecticut does not. As a matter of fact, as I have mentioned in other blog posts, Connecticut does not even have a Licensing Board for LCSW’s, LMFT’s, LPC’s or LADC’s…the only “regulation” is directly through the Department of Public Health Office of Licensing.

All others are not regulated in any way!
Credentials/Titles such as those below are not Licensed Professions: I inserted blanks, as these titles will usually have a descriptive word or two before ( sometimes after) the title.ie…. “Spiritual” Counselor, “Mental Health” Advisor, “Life” Coach, “Career” Consultant

Mental Health Counselor
Hypnotherapist
Psychotherapist
Allied health Professional
Certified __________***Certifications*** are not licenses
___________Counselor (except as above…LADC, LPC)
___________ Therapist ( except as above…LMFT)
___________Consultant
___________ Coach
___________ Advisor
___________ Analyst

Anyone, without so much as a High School Diploma, can legally proclaim and use these titles!
….and there are others! People can be rather creative when coming up with titles that sound “professional”!
Nationwide, the Mental Health Profession is very poorly regulated! However you are taking a huge risk by using the services of an Unlicensed Practitioner. There is little recourse against unethical acts for the client of a Licensed Professional, there is zero recourse against unethical acts of an unlicensed practitioner!